How to protect your cargo from unforeseen circumstances

As a merchant or customer, you’ll undoubtedly agree with us that products being destroyed during transportation is a big catastrophe. Whether you’re the one waiting for your cargo to arrive only to get a whole bunch of mush, or you’re the one dealing with irritated customer complaints about damaged products, you’re sure to discover some […]

As a merchant or customer, you’ll undoubtedly agree with us that products being destroyed during transportation is a big catastrophe. Whether you’re the one waiting for your cargo to arrive only to get a whole bunch of mush, or you’re the one dealing with irritated customer complaints about damaged products, you’re sure to discover some helpful advice in this article that will help you prevent this sort of trouble.

While a damaged shipment is clearly inconvenient for customers, sellers are often the most impacted since responsibility is typically borne by them. Even if a company is not legally liable for the losses, the ramifications for the company – hefty return costs and brand harm, for example – may be very damaging.

Why are your products at risk of being destroyed during the shipping process?


Much of what occurs after your cargo is loaded is, regrettably, beyond your control, which is why shippers must be realistic about their shipment and anticipate every potential situation.

Transportation of products, regardless of the vehicle utilized, always includes a certain degree of abrupt movements, jostling, twists and turns. Furthermore, shipping goods are not often dumped from heights of up to four feet at some point.

Human elements should also be considered – whether you like it or not, your products will be handled by numerous people throughout transportation, thus theft or loss are unfortunately something you must prevent by preparing ahead of time.

Last but not least, shipments are often subjected to large and rapid fluctuations in heat and humidity, which may be very dangerous for delicate goods.

As deterrent as all of the above may seem, you’ll be pleased – or rather relieved – to realize that there are numerous measures you can take to safeguard your cargo from all of this.

Shipping Damage Avoidance Tips


Choose your container and pallets with care.
Providing the greatest protection for your goods will go a long way toward ensuring that it can withstand the different dynamic and static stresses encountered en route. Always choose the correct-sized container for your cargo and ensure that it is not damaged (or ensure that your agency does).

Furthermore, you should avoid cheaper shipping alternatives that may jeopardize your cargo, which is a frequent occurrence when deciding between LCL (Less Than Container Load) and FCL (Full Container Load) (Full Container). For goods weighing more than 10 CBM, a 20-foot container is unquestionably a better option than a Shared Container (LCL), since the latter requires much more management during transportation.

Use the proper pallets for your products. Each pallet should be bigger than the object it is holding. If your objects dangle over the sides, they may collide with other items.

Consider how you can effectively arrange your cargo.
Apart from choosing appropriate pallets and containers, you need also prepare for the stacking of your products and how you will fill your container. As a general guideline, you should stack heavy objects like bricks to properly distribute weight. If any of your products can not survive being piled on top of them, be sure to clearly state this on the labeling.

When stacking your goods, keep in mind that there may be some shaking and tilting during transportation; leaving empty gaps between each item is virtually asking for harm. Always fill up these gaps to ensure that your luggage is as compact as possible.

Purchase insurance.
Although insurance will not prevent your cargo from being damaged, it is unquestionably an important precaution that will protect the financial elements of your shipping procedure.

Because some harm is just unavoidable, you should also concentrate on safeguarding yourself from the unavoidable.

Take extra care with your labeling.
As dangerous as goods shipping may seem, keep in mind that it is mostly controlled by people, so speaking clearly with them will go a long way toward ensuring your cargo is handled correctly.

Simple steps like labeling fragile products with the term “Fragile” or identifying which side is up and which side is down may make a huge impact in the safety of your goods.

Aside from properly identifying your products, make sure you provide your cargo agent specific directions on how to load your package so that truckers and coloaders handle your cargo appropriately.

As you can see, although shipping damage is inconvenient and frequent in imports and exports, it is not inevitable. You may avoid significant damage to your company by following a few easy measures.

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